Current 2019-2020 Calendar

October 4 & 5, 2019

In-Between Times: Something Gone, Something Not Yet

James Hollis, Ph.D, Jungian Analyst

Wandering between two worlds, one dead, the other powerless to be born. Matthew Arnold, 1885

Friday Evening Presentation: As individuals, we often find ourselves in in-between times, somewhere between a world we knew, and a world that has not yet emerged. These times are hours of crisis, disorientation, loss, and enormous anxiety. Similarly cultures, eras, civilizations go through in-between times. Ours is such a moment in history. How can we recover our bearings, sustain dignity and integrity when things fall apart? What abides amid such discontinuity? Together we will reflect on what we may do to recover a sense of personal autonomy when our roadmap whirls from our grasp and leaves us confounded. How do we find resilience, recover our center, when the world around us, or at least our road map of it, fails us?

This presentation is coming out as a book in the Summer of 2020 and is titled: Living Between Worlds: Finding Personal Resilience in Changing Times.

Note: if you want any of James’ books autographed, please bring them, as none will be for sale on site.

Saturday Workshop: Portraits in Personal Pathology

Given that “psychopathology translates as “the expression of the suffering of the soul,” what are the generative forces that produce pathology? What are some examples of common pathologic states? What are our reflexive protections against pathology? What are the challenges of living in a pathogenic world, with a pathologized soul? How can we recognize our anxiety mechanisms, the degree to which they operate autonomously, and how we can gave some greater liberation from them.

James Hollis, PhD. James Hollis, Ph.D. is a Jungian Analyst in private practice in Washington, D.C., former director of the Jung Center of Houston, and the Jung Society of Washington. He has written sixteen books, the next being, Living Between Worlds.

Time/Place: Friday Evening: 7:30 pm. Registration begins at 7 pm. Movement Dialogues Studio, 4805 Park Road, Suite 200, Charlotte, NC 28209. Saturday: 9:30am – 12:30 pm. Registration begins at 9:00 a.m. Same location. Reservations unnecessary. Pricing:Friday evening - $10 members and students; $15 non-members. Saturday workshop - $40 members and students; $45 non-members. Partial scholarships are available based on attendee’s ability to pay, contact the treasurer, Larry Sorkin, prior to the event at 704.236.2337 or sorkinwood@gmail.com.

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November 8 & 9, 2019

Dreams and Death

Jenny Yates, Ph.D., Jungian Analyst

Not only my own dreams but occasionally the dreams of others, helped to shape, revise, or confirm my views on a life after death. Jung, On Life After Death

As we lose people in our lives or we start to grow older ourselves, death is a topic of importance to all of us. Carl Jung suggested that we ought to have a myth about death, viewing it as a goal—the destination of the journey of the second half of life. Dr. Jenny Yates will present Jung’s views on the role of dreams surrounding death and life after death. She will show us how Jung came to formulate his ideas about this topic by using his own dreams and those of his clients. She will pay special attention to the role of synchronicity.

Friday Evening Presentation: At the beginning of his career, Jung’s father died. Six weeks after his death, he appeared to Jung in a vivid dream announcing that he would be coming home after a holiday. This event began Jung’s reflection on life after death. Dr. Yates will present Jung’s views on the role of dreams regarding death and immortality that began with his father’s death and continued throughout his life. She will explore the role of synchronicity between dreams of someone dying and actual death, how the dead speak through dreams, the role of his dream/vision following a near death experience, and how dreams influenced his views of life after death.

Saturday Workshop: : In the workshop, participants will share dreams surrounding death, with special attention to synchronicity, the dreaming of someone dying without causal access to this information. We shall also discuss archetypal interpretations of dreams and visions linked to his near-death experience.

Dr. Jenny Yates has a Master of Arts in Religion degree from Yale Divinity School, a Ph.D. in Religion and Philosophy from Syracuse University, and a diploma in Analytical Psychology from the Jung Institute in Zurich, Switzerland. She began her practice as a Jungian Analyst in 1992. Currently, she teaches Jungian Psychology and Religion in the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies at the University of North Carolina, Wilmington. Prior to her move to the beach, she Chaired the Department of Religion at Wells College in Aurora, N. Y., where she was a Professor of Religion for twenty-seven years. She is the author of four books, most recently, Jung on Death and Immortality.

Time/Place: Friday Evening: 7:30 pm. Registration begins at 7 pm. Movement Dialogues Studio, 4805 Park Road, Suite 200, Charlotte, NC 28209. Saturday: 9:30am – 12:30 pm. Registration begins at 9:00 a.m. Same location. Reservations unnecessary. Pricing: Friday evening - $10 members and students; $15 non-members. Saturday workshop - $40 members and students; $45 non-members. Partial scholarships are available based on attendee’s ability to pay, contact the treasurer, Larry Sorkin, prior to the event at 704.236.2337 or sorkinwood@gmail.com.

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Sunday Afternoon, December 15, 2019

Our Annual Free Program

The Season of Shadows and Light:

Poetry’s Dialogue with Psyche

Local Poets

Tanja Bechtler, Cello and Robert Teixeira, Guitar

The unborn work in the psyche of the artist is a force of nature that achieves its end either with tyrannical might or with the subtle cunning of nature herself, quite regardless of the personal fate of the man who is its vehicle. The creative urge lives and grows in him like a tree in the earth from which it draws its nourishment.... C G Jung, The Spirit of Man, Art and Literature

Last year’s program of poetry and music to enter the holiday season was such a success that we’re bringing it back! What better way to explore the shadows and revel in coming light than with the insight of poetry carried on the ecstatic waves of music. The stage set with candles and flowers, local poets take a turn reading and discussing poems that compel, inspire and console all carried on the impromptu musical accompaniment of Tanja Bechtler, cello and Robert Teixeira, guitar.

Time/Place: Sunday Afternoon 4:30 pm. Doors open at 4:00 pm. Movement Dialogues Studio. Free program.

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January 17 & 18, 2020

Integrating the Wisdom of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Jennifer Leigh Selig, Ph.D.

Friday Evening Presentation: Out of a Mountain of Despair, a Stone of Hope: The Relationship Between Hope and Despair in Times of Crisis

This lecture explores the opposite but intertwined effects of hope and despair, and their relationship to our ability to take action in times of personal and cultural crisis. After establishing our cultural addiction to hope, we’ll turn to Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Civil Rights Movement as a case study. King’s complicated history with hope and despair is worth mining for its inspiration and wisdom today, as we too are living in a time of cultural disintegration and collective despair, causing many of us to experience personal dis-ease. The lecture will end by offering the symbol of the mandala as a way to hold Jung’s “tension of the opposites” of hope and despair, and still take action on behalf of King’s concept of the beloved community.

Saturday Workshop: Transforming the Suffering of the Soul Through Our Gifts of Grace

C. G. Jung wrote, “All creativeness in the realm of spirit as well as every psychic advance of man arises from the suffering of the soul.” He thought we heal from our suffering through the gift of grace. I would add that we heal and offer healing to the suffering world through the gifts we have been graced with.

Participants will be encouraged to take a current issue where their soul suffers and they struggle with despair. We will explore this issue in light of educator Parker J. Palmer’s idea of “the tragic gap,” drawing upon Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech for the gaps he spoke of therein. We’ll discuss King’s solution for closing the gap, comparing them to Jung’s four gifts of grace. Then, through journaling and a gentle process of small group witnessing, each person’s gifts of grace will be uncovered. We’ll discern creative ways to use those gifts to take action on behalf of beloved communities of any scale where there is suffering (marriage, family, work, city, state, country, globe, etc.). The workshop will end with author Aurora Leveins Morales’ three “profound sources of nourishment” to sustain our activism in times of such personal and collective suffering and despair.

Jennifer Leigh Selig, PhD, is a depth psychologist, author, publisher, and a traveling educator with over 30 years of teaching experience, including the last 15 years at Pacifica Graduate Institute, where she was founding chair of the Jungian and Archetypal Studies doctoral program. She is the author of many essays and books, including Integration: The Psychology and Mythology of Martin Luther King, Jr. and His (Unfinished) Therapy With the Soul of America (2012), and she’s the co-author of Deep Creativity: Seven Ways to Spark Your Creative Spirit, with Dennis Patrick Slattery and Deborah Anne Quibell (2019).

Time/Place: Friday Evening: 7:30 pm. Registration begins at 7 pm. Movement Dialogues Studio, 4805 Park Road, Suite 200, Charlotte, NC 28209. Saturday: 9:30am – 12:30 pm. Registration begins at 9:00 a.m. Same location. Reservations unnecessary. Pricing: Friday evening - $10 members and students; $15 non-members. Saturday workshop - $40 members and students; $45 non-members. Partial scholarships are available based on attendee’s ability to pay, contact the treasurer, Larry Sorkin, prior to the event at 704.236.2337 or sorkinwood@gmail.com.

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March 6 & 7, 2020

Chaos Monsters in our Current Lives

Carolyn Bates, Ph.D., Jungian Analyst

The current Zeitgeist of discontent in our culture carries ripe opportunities for fantasies of the Apocalypse. The ground of long-known security has cracked beneath us, foundations have shifted, and we have encountered Chaos Monsters rushing towards us, not content to slumber in ancient times. We meet "monsters" at key moments in the process of psychological growth. Jung considered that monsters bring us vital messages and warnings regarding the psychological status quo.

Friday Evening Presentation: We Have Met the Apocalypse, and It Is Us. Jung would remind us that it is just at such moments, when we cannot believe what is upon us, that we have the chance to examine the meaning of a monster’s appearance on the scene. When the monster of the apocalypse appears – in our individual, family, work, and cultural psyche—what messages might that monster carry toward us? Can its arrival be understood in such a way that renders it less frightening? If, like St. Francis, we sit and dialogue with the marauding, monstrous wolf at the door, can reconciliation come of that contemplative relating? We may well see some part of ourselves mirrored in the apocalyptic monster that would shed light on our next step of psychological individuation.

Saturday Workshop: Meeting the Monster under the Bed: Archetypal Expressions of the Other reflected in Film, Dreams, and Culture. The dark creatures that haunt the imaginations of children, the threatening strangers, terrifying killers, and vicious animals that move through the dreams of adults, the terrors encountered in agedness—we fear and avoid our monsters. These images appear terrifying because they represent a fundamental otherness within us, something tapping at the windows of our consciousness, pressing to be integrated so that our own psychological development may proceed. Using lecture, film clips, and group discussion, we will explore how threatening, ominous, and frightening images and experiences present us with valuable opportunities for individuation. Participants will discuss their experiences of the subjective sense of the “monstrous” in their lives. We will draw on historical examples of monstrosity to clarify the tasks at hand when encountering it in our personal lives, and in our encounters with the collective.

Carolyn Bates, Ph.D. is a psychologist and diplomate Jungian analyst who lives and practices in Austin, Texas. In addition to her analytic practice, she currently serves as President of the Texas Seminar of the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts training institute. She offers presentations, workshops, and classes on dream interpretation, the symbolism of pilgrimage, the feminine archetype in dreams and fairy tales, and the phenomenon of synchronicity and trauma in the collective.

Time/Place: Friday Evening: 7:30 pm. Registration begins at 7 pm. Movement Dialogues Studio, 4805 Park Road, Suite 200, Charlotte, NC 28209. Saturday: 9:30am – 12:30 pm. Registration begins at 9:00 a.m. Same location. Reservations unnecessary. Pricing: Friday evening - $10 members and students; $15 non-members. Saturday workshop - $40 members and students; $45 non-members. Partial scholarships are available based on attendee’s ability to pay, contact the treasurer, Larry Sorkin, prior to the event at 704.236.2337 or sorkinwood@gmail.com.